Our News & Plans

Founded in 2015 and incorporated as a 501(c)(3) in 2020, Native Gardens of Blue Hill continues to grow as a unique model and resource for sustainable gardening and landscaping in our community.
Our 2021 fundraising goal is $15,000.
With this money, we will continue to expand our gardens, woodland trails, and programs.
Thank you to all our volunteers and donors!

Project Plans

Click on the photos below to read about some of the projects we are undertaking with support from our volunteers and donors.

Summer 2021 Highlight: Reintroducing our Maine native lupine

The NGBH gardens and trails are home to dynamic plant communities that continually teach and surprise us! This summer, we discovered an expanding patch of sundial lupine (lupinus perennis), a plant native to Maine that has become extinct in the wild due to habitat loss. We planted it [from seed?] [X] years ago in a former gravel lot, hoping to reintroduce this species and build soil fertility. This project is showing signs of success—the initial plants have self-seeded up to a few feet away, indicating that they will thrive in this spot!

 

As we encourage the spread of our native lupine, we are also working to remove non-native lupine plants from the property to limit confusion as new seedlings emerge. The photos below showcase the sundial lupine and our efforts to promote it. In our bi-weekly volunteer sessions and hands-on training classes launched this year, not only do we build demonstration gardens of native plants—we also learn from our gardens how species behave and interact with one another and with the environment.

This unique community project fosters

innovative thought and gardening practice.  

 

Help us continue this work.

Lupinus perennis leaves
Lupinus perennis leaves

Photo credit: Martha Moss

Lupinus perennis in bloom
Lupinus perennis in bloom

Photo credit: Martha Moss

Lupinus perennis seed pods
Lupinus perennis seed pods

Photo credit: Martha Moss

Lupinus perennis expanding
Lupinus perennis expanding

New plants popped up this year several feet from the parent plants, showing how far these seeds can launch!

Lupinus perennis seedlings
Lupinus perennis seedlings

Two weeks after seeds were sown, some are already starting to grow true leaves!

Removing non-native lupines
Removing non-native lupines

Katie and Avy worked to remove non-native lupines to minimize confusion as new lupine seedlings emerge.